Past workshops and events

RDS regularly hosts several workshops each semester on various data management and data publishing topics. RDS is also happy to visit labs and other research units to provide specialized talks and workshops. Let us know what your group would be interested in hearing about or get more information about our service.

This page is our archive of previous workshop information and materials, while our current workshop information will be contained within our Workshops page.

2016-17 Workshops

Fall 2016

Data Rescue

September 13, 10-11am, Main Library 314 (Link to register)
October 4, 12-1pm, Grainger 335 (Link to register)
Worksheets and slides are available at http://hdl.handle.net/2142/91602

Have a mess of data floating around your computer or lab? Data management is an essential task for students and faculty but hard to get started. Go no further! In this workshop you will identify, group, and plan on how to reorganize your current and future data. We will discuss strategies for organization, folder structure, and create an organizational plan.

Creating Data Documentation

September 20, 10-11am, Main Library 314 (Link to register)
October  11, 12-1pm, Grainger 335 (Link to register)
Worksheets and slides are available at http://hdl.handle.net/2142/91611

Writing project, code, and data documentation doesn’t need to be the worst part of your day. This hands on workshop will give you experience using various types of documentation, discuss strategies for writing documentation, and get you started writing a template for your projects. Bring a dataset you’d like to work with but examples will be provided.

Preparing for Data Sharing

September 27, 10-11am, Main Library 314 (Link to register)
October 25, 12-1pm, Grainger 335 (Link to register)
Worksheets and slides are available at http://hdl.handle.net/2142/91615

Making research data public is becoming a reality for many disciplines, but for many researchers and disciplines there is a complicated set of issues to consider before publication or sharing data. This workshop will cover the basics steps of research data publication, from considerations to depositing. Participants will work through guidance to help them make decisions about when and how to publish or share data.

Data Workflow Mapping

November 1, 10-11:30, Main Library 314 (Large project flavor, Link to register)
November 8, 10-11:30, Grainger Library 335 (Computational data flavor, Link to register)
Worksheets and slides are available at http://hdl.handle.net/2142/91639

Workflow mapping is a useful tool for teams of all sizes to understand how data, code, and other resources are being shared and passed around.  Like retracing your steps after losing something, tracing a project through workflows identifies all the essential products and dependencies of the research process, and can be one of the most useful places to get started with data management.  This workshop focuses specifically on computational research processes, but can be adapted to most types of projects.

Smart and Simple Data Management

October 7, 1-2:30pm, Funk/ACES 509 (Link to register)
October 12, 1-2:30pm, Grainger 335 (Link to register)
Worksheets and slides forthcoming

Note:  This is a blended workshop combining materials from our Data Rescue and Creating Data Documentation workshops, with a special focus on creating Data Management Plans.

This session aims to provide you with data management best practices and tools to increase your research efficiency and impact. We’ll present a basic introduction to data management using a data management plan framework, hands on activities, and discuss how to find and vet resources for making data publicly accessible.

2015-16 Workshops

Spring 2016

Would you like to attend one of these workshops but can’t make it to the library? Contact us and we’ll be happy to try and schedule something closer to you or answer any questions you would have wanted to ask.

Introduction to Data Management

February 16 (Tuesday) 10:00-11:00am, Library 314
Slides (opens as .pdf)
Registration Link

Elizabeth Wickes, Sarah Williams, Heidi Imker, and Christie Wiley

This workshop introduces the elements of robust data management, including planning, organization, documentation, storage, and archiving. Attendees will identify gaps in their current data management practices and learn what steps they can take to address those gaps.  This is the first of three sessions in a series of workshops focused on data management.

Documentation and Organization for Data and Processes

February 23 (Tuesday) 10:00-11:00am, Library 314
Slides (opens as .pdf)
Worksheets (opens as .docx)
Registration Link

Peg Burnette, Ayla Stein, and Elise Dunham

Proactive strategic planning for the organization and documentation of research data contributes to the quality and usability of data. The first half of this session will provide strategies for data planning, such as the creation of workflow diagrams, and best practices for data documentation and organization. The second half will be hands-on time for participants to work on individual project related data planning and organization. Participants are encouraged to bring their own project related data to work on with instructors and librarians on hand to answer questions. Please contact organizers ahead of time if you have specific data issues or challenges so they can be sure to have the right expertise/resources on hand.

Making Research Data Public: Why, What, and How

March 1 (Tuesday), 10:00-11:00, Library 314
Slides (opens as .pdf)
Registration Link

Karen Hogenboom, Beth Sheehan, and Elizabeth Wickes

Increasingly, funders and publishers are requiring researchers to publish and/or share research datasets. For many researchers and disciplines, there is a complicated set of issues to consider before publication or sharing data. This workshop will cover the basics of research data publication. Participants will come away with a framework to help them make decisions about when and how to publish or share data. This is the last session in series of workshops focused on data management.

Stay tuned for additional workshops as they come up!

Sane and Simple Data Management for the Busy Researcher

March 15, 2016 11:00-12:30pm
Funk/ACES Library room 509
Slides (opens as .pdf)

Heidi Imker & Sarah Williams

This session aims to provide you with data management best practices and tools to increase your research efficiency and impact. We’ll present a basic introduction to data management using a data management plan framework and discuss how to find and vet resources for making data publicly accessible.

Fall 2015

Introduction to Data Management

Slides (opens as .pdf)

Elizabeth Wickes, Sarah Williams, Heidi Imker, and Christie Wiley

This workshop introduces the elements of robust data management, including planning, organization, documentation, storage, and archiving. Attendees will identify gaps in their current data management practices and learn what steps they can take to address those gaps.  This is the first of three sessions in a series of workshops focused on data management.

Documentation and Organization for Data and Processes

Slides (opens as .pdf)
Worksheets (opens as .docx)

Peg Burnette, Ayla Stein, and Elise Dunham

Proactive strategic planning for the organization and documentation of research data contributes to the quality and usability of data. The first half of this session will provide strategies for data planning, such as the creation of workflow diagrams, and best practices for data documentation and organization. The second half will be hands-on time for participants to work on individual project related data planning and organization. Participants are encouraged to bring their own project related data to work on with instructors and librarians on hand to answer questions. Please contact organizers ahead of time if you have specific data issues or challenges so they can be sure to have the right expertise/resources on hand.

Making Research Data Public: Why, What, and How

Slides (opens as .pdf)

Karen Hogenboom, Beth Sheehan, and Heidi Imker

Increasingly, funders and publishers are requiring researchers to publish and/or share research datasets. For many researchers and disciplines, there is a complicated set of issues to consider before publication or sharing data. This workshop will cover the basics of research data publication. Participants will come away with a framework to help them make decisions about when and how to publish or share data. This is the last session in series of workshops focused on data management.

Public Access Requirements for Articles and Data

Special two-part session beginning with a seminar covering public access for articles and data followed by a workshop for writing data management plans.  Attendees need not attend both sessions.  

Slides (opens as .pdf)

Aaron McCollough and Heidi Imker

Do you work with federal research grants? Funding agencies have issued implementation plans in response to the 2013 OSTP public access memo. Changes are on the horizon for making both articles and research data publically accessible.  Join us at the Main Library for an hour long seminar to find out how these requirements will impact the grants that you work with.

Following the seminar, the Research Data Service will host a workshop on writing Data Management Plans (DMPs). These plans are becoming an increasingly important component of the grant application process and contents are sometimes considered part of the evaluation process. As soon as October 2015, eight more funders may begin requiring DMPs for grant applications. This workshop includes an introduction to the core requirements of data management plans, discussion of specific funder requirements, approaches for evaluating your project’s data needs, and working time to start writing a DMP. Participants are encouraged to bring in project examples or case studies to base an example data management plan on, but some case studies will be offered.

Managing Research Data

(Presented at the 2016 Computational Social Science Workshop)

Slides

Computational social science projects often quickly expand in the quantity and complexity of their data and software needs. This presentation introduces the core data management needs for working within these environments. These projects require more intentional planning and organization for preservation and analysis. Project organization, defensive documentation, reproducible research, formatting for preservation, backup, and planning will be covered.

2014-15 Workshops

Introduction to Data Management

Christie Wiley, Sarah Williams, and Heidi Imker
Slides (opens as .pdf)

This workshop introduces the elements of robust data management, including planning, organization, documentation, storage, and archiving. Attendees will identify gaps in their current data management practices and learn what steps they can take to address those gaps.  This is the first of three sessions in a series of workshops focused on data management.

Documentation and Organization for Data and Processes

Peg Burnette, Ayla Stein, and Heidi Imker
Slides (opens as .pdf)

Documentation and organization are key to ensuring that your research data is not only understandable to yourself and others in the future, but also for maintaining the consistency and quality of your research results. Attendees will identify what documentation and metadata are essential to their research and learn general organization strategies including best practice for file structure, storage and backup.  This is the second of three sessions in a series of workshops focused on data management.

Making Research Data Public: Why, What, and How

Karen Hogenboom, Beth Sheehan, and Heidi Imker
Slides (opens as .pdf)

Increasingly, funders and publishers are requiring researchers to publish and/or share research datasets. For many researchers and disciplines, there is a complicated set of issues to consider before publication or sharing data. This workshop will cover the basics of research data publication. Participants will come away with a framework to help them make decisions about when and how to publish or share data. This is the last session in series of workshops focused on data management.